Posted by: paragon | March 4, 2007

MORE FREQUENT AND MORE DAMAGING ATTACKS ON DNS

For Immediate Release

Press Contact:

Michael Azzano

Cosmo PR

415/596-1978

michael@cosmo-pr.com

DNS EXPERT CALLS FOR PREPAREDNESS IN FACE OF POTENTIALLY

MORE FREQUENT AND MORE DAMAGING ATTACKS ON DNS

DNSstuff.com unveils one of the first public root server time maps to track performance

and minimize business risk; Recent survey data reveals that 70% of all DNS servers have

one or more improperly configured settings

Newburyport, MA – February 8, 2007 – DNSstuff.com, a global leader in DNS issues

and tools with one of the largest communities of IT professionals on the Web, today

issued a warning and called for greater preparedness as a result of the recent attack

targeting root servers. This attack is the latest in a series of distributed denial-of-service

attacks targeting DNS servers that began late last year. DNSstuff.com today also

introduced a new root server time map tool designed to help IT professionals track the

performance of and possible attacks on these servers.

“It is likely that this latest apparent probing effort was testing the resiliency of DNS,”

explained Paul D. Parisi, CTO of DNSstuff.com. “This could be a harbinger of more

targeted attacks against .com parent servers or even individual enterprise servers, neither

of which may have the resiliency or redundancy of the systems attacked earlier this week.

Either of these scenarios could have catastrophic consequences for the Internet-at-large or

specific organizations.”

New Tool to Spot Attacks

The new DNSstuff.com root server time map allows IT professionals to monitor the state

of root and .com servers supporting DNS. Now anyone can check real-time performance

of these servers to spot long latency times or unusual behavior in response times. The

root server time map can be found at http://www.dnsstuff.com/info/roottimes.htm.

Even without an increase in targeted or malicious attacks on DNS servers, many of those

same servers remain vulnerable or are performing poorly because of simple human error.

There are over 85 million domains on the Web, and a survey by DNSstuff.com of its

users revealed that there are significant, fixable configuration issues with DNS settings

for nearly 70% of those active domains. These incorrect settings can lead to site outages

or improperly routed email, and a targeted attack exploiting these settings could lead to

even more widespread network and Internet outages.

Simple Prevention Settings

“We are a robust web application and the Web’s acknowledged leader in helping IT

professionals better manage their networks and DNS through expert advice, best practices

and relevant resources,” continued Parisi. “Unfortunately, many people are relying on

improperly configured DNS and are unintentionally leaving themselves, and therefore the

web, vulnerable to attack. ”

There are some simple steps that can be taken to improve DNS security at an enterprise

level. These include maintaining a minimum of two physically and geographically

separate servers to help thwart a denial-of-service attack, and proper configuration of

your Primary and Secondary name servers to utilize the natural resiliency of DNS. More

tips and information for DNS configuration can be found at DNSstuff.com or by signing

up for the company’s monthly IQ Mail by emailing DNSIQ@dnsstuff.com.

About DNSstuff.com

DNSstuff.com is the Web’s premiere destination for DNS professionals, offering free

online tools to monitor and maintain one of the most vital, yet vulnerable, lynchpins in

the infrastructure supporting the Web – the Domain Name System. DNSstuff.com is a

web application providing expertise and all the tools necessary to ensure that your DNS

operates smoothly, efficiently and safely. It is one of the largest and most trusted

communities of IT professionals on the Web, and can be found at http://www.dnsstuff.com.

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